— 2 min read

When someone new joins your team, they are very vulnerable. Due to that their managers have an opportunity to make sure they get a strong starting boost and become good fast. At the same time managers can break them and slow their development to an halt. It all boils down to OKRs.

manager simulator

Weekdone Manager Simulator features a small game, that let's you play through an interaction between you, a manager, and a new employee. In the game the answers are quite obvious, yet in real life, it's very easy to let them know that they should figure some thing out by themselves and not waste your precious time.

Setting meaningful goals and OKRs.

The most import thing for new employees (and old timers as well) is to make sure they understand what's expected of them.

Setting clear measurable goals from day one is vital for the success of any team.

In Weekdone we focus on OKRs: Objectives and Key Results.

OKR_statistics_dashboard

Objectives and Key Results.

In simple terms, OKRs is a easy process of setting company, team and personal goals and connecting each goal with 3-4 measurable results. As you achieve those results, the whole objective gets marked done.

OKRs, on a personal, team's and company level make up a system that shows how everything one person does connects to the work of others.

If an employee knows that not meeting his goals makes achievements harder for people in other departments, it makes them try harder.

When everyone know how their work matters, it increases overall engagement, motivation and determination.

What's most important, OKRs that combine them to the team and company, let new employees know that they are an important part of a system and they know what they must do.

This is a huge confidence boost that let's them start shining on their first day.

The surprising aspect of OKRs is that it really suits everyone, regardless of their industry or size. Each team can find the optimal way for implementation. And if there is one best practice methodology any company can implement, it's this. You just can't go wrong.